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What are SPS Members reading about in their SPS newletters?

What are SPS Members reading about in their SPS newsletters?  Join Today!

Section ConnectionFrom the Aging Section Connection

“For many psychotherapists, the idea of working with older men is especially daunting. The stereotypes of older men—emotionally distant, grumpy, nonverbal, resistant to change— could make even an adventurous therapist avoid the inevitable frustration of trying to create a therapeutic relationship.”

RICHARD GOLLANCE, LCSW, MSG

I just came to talk: Engaging Older Men in Psychotherapy

 

From ATOD Section Connection

“The family member asked for money is placed in the position of making a tough choice. If she or he gives the money to the person with the addiction then there is the likelihood that future substance use will be funded. Refusing to give the money to the addicted person means the relative with the money must manage her or his own reaction tothe addicted person’s response.”

 

JOAN GALLIMORE, MSW, LCSW, CSI

Addiction and Family

 

From the Child Welfare Section Connection

 

The absence of an epidemiological perspective profoundly limits our ability to make informed modifications to CPS practices or policies. The newly linked data sources from the state of California advance our knowledge of risk factors for both non-fatal and fatal child maltreatment.

 

EMILY PUTNAM-HORNSTEIN, PHD, MSSW

Child Fatalities: An Overview of Recent Epidemiological Data from California

 

 From the Mental Health Section Connection

 

“Whether you are a manager or a member of the line staff, you should remember the focus and orientation of the other group in order to prevent systemic problems. You do not want to work as if you are on two different teams.”

 

DAVID J. LE VINE, LMSW

Do You Sometimes Feel As If You Are on Two Different Teams


 

 

 
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